Sherecce Fields

Fields’ primary research examines factors related to the initiation and maintenance of tobacco smoking in children and adolescents in order to inform and develop effective treatments. Her secondary research line extends the knowledge learned from adolescent addiction research to eating behavior and obesity in adolescents. Through both areas of research, she is also studying the neural mechanisms that underlie performance on laboratory behavioral tasks modeling impulsive behaviors in order to better inform prevention and treatment interventions.

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Vish Viswanath

Dr. Viswanath’s work, drawing from literatures in communication science, social epidemiology, and social and health behavior sciences, focuses on translational communication science to influence public health policy and practice. His primary research is on documenting the relationship between communication inequalities, poverty and health disparities, and knowledge translation through community-based research to address health disparities..

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Kirk Dombrowski

Kirk Dombrowski’s research focuses on broad interdisciplinary approaches to addiction and its related social and personal harms. This means that his work crosses fields including sociology, anthropology, psychology and political-economy. His areas of specialization include social network analysis, ethnography, urban public health, community-based participatory research and Native Americans.

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Robert Hummer

Dr. Hummer’s research is focused on the accurate documentation and more complete understanding of health and mortality disparities by race/ethnicity/nativity and socioeconomic status in the United States. His current work includes projects that accurately document and provide a more complete understanding of educational and race/ethnic disparities in U.S. health and mortality.

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James S. Jackson

James S. Jackson’s research revolves around issues of racial and ethnic influences on life course development, attitude change, reciprocity, social support, and coping and health among blacks in the Diaspora. He is the Daniel Katz Distinguished University Professor of Psychology, Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education, school of Public Health, and Director of the Institute for Social Research, all at the University of Michigan.

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Timothey P. Johnson

Johnson’s main areas of expertise include survey methodology and health behaviors in disadvantaged populations. Within the field of survey methodology, his work has focused primarily on sources of measurement and non response error. His measurement error work is concerned with cultural variability in the cognitive processing of survey questions, in the cognitive processing of survey questions, an area in which much of his work has been invested over the past decade. He has also conducted numerous investigations designed to validate self-reported health information.

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Denis Anthony

Denis is by training a mental health nurse and adult (medical-surgical) nurse. However, in mid-career he moved into engineering and computing but now works in health research, largely as a statistician. He was a statistical consultant to the Oxford Health Alliance for the Communities in Health programme 2011-2016, and is a Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society.

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Ming Wen

Wen is a sociologist of health, migration and child development. Her research centers on social determinants of health and well-being throughout the life course and across settings. She also scrutinizes disparities in energy balance outcomes by race, ethnicity, immigrant, and legal status and the mediating factors underlying these disparities.

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Gary L. Kreps

Dr. Kreps’ areas of expertise include health communication and promotion, information dissemination, organizational communication, information technology, multicultural relations, risk/crisis management, health informatics, and applied research methods. He is the Director of the Center for Health and Risk Communication, serves on the Governing Board of the Center for Social Science Research, and is a faculty affiliate of the National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, the Center for Health Policy Research and Ethics, the Center for the Study of International Medical Policies and Practices, Center for Climate Change Communication, the Center for Consciousness and Transformation, and the Center for Health Information Technology, at George Mason.

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Dr. Olga Davis

Dr. Davis is passionate about enhancing communication to improve the health and wellbeing of underserved populations. She helped establish a health coalition for refugee women in Maricopa County, and was appointed by Governor Napolitano to serve on the State Commission on Women’s and Children’s Health. In addition, Dr. Davis is intricately involved in promoting health among the African American community in Arizona.

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Mignon Moore

Professor Moore has research and teaching interests in the sociology of family, race, gender, sexuality, qualitative methods, aging, and adolescence. She has done research on the intersection of race and sexual orientation for family-building and lesbian identity among African-American Women. She is currently doing research involving the negotiation of religious and community life for lesbians and gay men of faith, and the promotion of health aging for racial and ethnic minority elders.

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Tyson Brown

Dr. Brown is an assistant professor of sociology and the co-director of the Center for Biobehavioral Health Disparities Research. His research examines how and why racial/ethnic stratification and other axes of inequality combine to shape health and wealth across the life course.

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Roberto Abadie

Roberto Abadie is an anthropologist who has conducted extensive research on HIV, Intravenous Drug Users and the ethics of clinical trials research. He is a Senior Researcher at SNRG (Social Network Research Group) at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. Abadie is the Research Assistant Professor at the Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and a field director for the NIH-funded study of “Injector Social Networks in Rural Puerto Rico.”

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Jimi Adams

Adams’ research revolves around addressing how networks constrain or promote the diffusion of information and/or diseases through populations. Much of this work has focused on HIV/AIDS in “high risk” populations in the US and Sub-Saharan Africa. He has a primary interest in using social network theory to improve strategies used in the design and implementation of primary data collection projects.

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Ralph DiClemente

Dr. DiClemente’s research has 4 key foci: (1) developing interventions to reduce the risk of HIV/STD among vulnerable adolescents and women; (2) developing interventions to enhance vaccine uptake among high-risk adolescents and women, such HPV vaccine; (3) developing implementation science interventions to enhance the uptake, adoption and sustainability of HIV/STD prevention programs in the community; and (4) developing diabetes screening and behavior change interventions to identify people with diabetes who are unaware of their disease status as well as reduce the risk of diabetes among vulnerable populations.

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Carol Kaufman

Kaufman is a demographer/sociologist with major research interests in: (1) The cultural and community context of adolescent sexual health risks; (2) the adaptation, implementation, evaluation, and dissemination of theory-based health interventions within and across diverse communities; and (3) new applications and approaches in research design and methodology.

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Mohan Dutta

Mohan Dutta's research examines marginalization in contemporary healthcare, health care inequalities, the intersections of poverty and health experiences at the margins, political economy of global health policies, the mobilization of cultural tropes for the justification of neo-colonial health development projects, the meanings of health in the realms of marginalized experiences in highly underserved communities in the global South, and the ways in which participatory culture-centered processes and strategies are organized in marginalized contexts to bring about changes in neo-colonial structures of global oppression and exploitation. Engaging in dialogues with subaltern communities at the global margins in imagining alternative spaces that resist neoliberal formations forms the crux of Professor Dutta's academic and activist projects.

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Stacy Rasmus

Stacy Rasmus, PhD, is Director of the Center for Alaska Native Health Research (CANHR) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. She holds a joint appointment with the Northwest Indian College, in western Washington state where she is PI of a Native American Research Center for Health (NARCH) program. Dr. Rasmus has worked with American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) communities for over two decades and has built an international program of research focusing on the promotion of Indigenous strengths, wellbeing and resilience in Alaska, the Arctic and the Pacific Northwest. Dr. Rasmus is trained in the social and behavioral sciences with specific expertise in the translation of Indigenous knowledge and practice into health interventions that are community-driven and culturally-centered. She currently leads several NIH, NSF and SAMHSA grants that together engage AIAN populations in research and evaluation initiatives to eliminate disparities in youth suicide and substance use disorders, with a special focus on alcohol, opioids and co-occurring disorders. In addition to her research program, Dr. Rasmus also directs NIH capacity building and training grants, most recently becoming the Alaska PI for the American Indian and Alaska Native Clinical Translational Research Program (AIAN CTRP), a collaborative program bridging universities and Tribal partners in Alaska and Montana.

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Russell Toomey

Framed by the tenets of the minority stress model, intersectionality, and positive youth development, his research identifies malleable family and other salient contextual (i.e., school, community) features that contribute to and mitigate health disparities experienced by marginalized adolescents in the United States. Largely, his research has examined these relationships with explicit attention to the minority-specific stressors of prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination that contribute to the disparate rates of negative outcomes experienced by sexual and gender diverse adolescents and Latinx youth, and the protective factors (e.g., family support, acceptance) that buffer these associations. Although most of his work has examined these populations separately, his current research integrates these two distinct – but conceptually similar - lines of research, and focuses on how the amalgamation of individuals’ multiple marginalized identities contributes to their contextual experiences and well-being.

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Alex Ortega

Alex Ortega, PhD, an epidemiologist, health services researcher, and community health interventionist, is Professor and Chair of the Department of Health Management and Policy and Director of the Center for Population Health and Community Impact in the Dornsife School of Public Health at Drexel University. Ortega is internationally-recognized for his research and public advocacy in improving the health and well-being of Latino children and families in the United States, especially for those who are undocumented or are otherwise disenfranchised. He has directed NIH, AHRQ, and foundation-funded research in a variety of sites and contexts, including Puerto Rico, New England, and Southern California. His research has been in a variety of areas focused on Latino health and health care, including: access to and use of health services for youth and families, the impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) on disparities, mental health services and psychiatric epidemiology, and community-engaged interventions to improve food environments in urban food swamps.

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